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Inspiration, Seekers

RUNAWAYS: Vancouver
As official sponsor of the Vancouver Marathon we want to share the must-see routes and iconic landmarks photographed by Chris Brinlee, Jr. with local trail running Seekers Hilary Matheson and Adam Gilbert Ciuk.

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Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge is one of Lynn Valley’s best kept secrets. The 50 meter high bridge stretches across a beautiful canyon boasting raging waters, waterfalls and deep pools below.

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Cleveland Dam is a concrete dam at the head of the Capilano River in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada that holds back Capilano Lake, also known as Capilano reservoir.

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Whytecliff Park is located near West Vancouver’s Horseshoe Bay Neighbourhood, the original name of which was White Cliff City, which opened in 1909.

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Burrard Bridge is a five-lane, Art Deco style, steel truss bridge constructed in 1930-1932 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. If you’re running in the Vancouver Marathon; enjoy the view as you hit mile 18 (29.5km).

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Hilary Matheson
DOB: May 25, 1989
Hometown: North Vancouver, BC
Currently: Burnaby, BC
Follow Hilary: Instagram, Twitter, Blog

Hilary is a Road Safety Coordinator. While it’s not the job she ever expected to have, she enjoys the fact that her job is to make roads safer, save lives, and build relationships with her community partners – whether that is with municipal police, mayors, engineers, senior citizens, or high school students just getting their licenses. She likes people, and gets to interact with all types!

Since she works 9-5 Monday to Friday, her weekly runs are usually done at night after work with friends. On the weekends she’ll do her long runs, which can range between 2 – 6 hours depending on what she’s training for. She prefers running with someone over plug in music simply because time goes by much faster when you’re chatting away (or trying to breathe and chat at the same time, which is easier said than done). You can bet she has a bag of dates with her on these long run, they are her favorite. That and peanut butter.

Why run? “Running keeps me sane, and gives me a place to channel my excess energy. Plus, I end up in the most beautiful places – how lucky am I?! I’ve also been fortunate to make some amazing friends through running, and these friendships have become an important part of the rest of my life, not just when I’m looking for a friend to drag my butt out for a rainy run.”

Hilary’s advise to a newby runner; “Don’t push too hard when you are starting out, or you will risk injury and burnout. You need to lay a solid foundation before you can start building mileage. Also, have fun!! Don’t forget that at the end of the day, the only person you are competing against is yourself. Celebrate baby steps, and don’t forget to look back once in a while to remember how far you’ve come.”

“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” – Mae West

Adam Gilbert Ciuk
DOB: October 27 1984
Hometown: Nelson BC
Currently: Vancouver, BC
Follow Adam: Instagram, Blog

Adam is a Plumber, currently building the Joseph & Rosalie Segal Family Heath Center at Vancouver General Hospital. He loves the challenges he’s faced with every day, and the people he works with.

His running routine isn’t so routine. He tries to change it up every time. Some days he wants to be unplugged and other times he just needs a song to kick him out the door. Lucky Vancouver has so many trails in the area and can run something new every day.

Why run? “I run to reach new places in the great outdoors. Progression in running opens the opportunity to see the unseen. Running makes everything so much better. It clears the mind, removes unwanted stress and cleanses the body. Its amazing how alive you’ll feel after a long run in the forest.”

Adam’s advise to a newby runner; “Start out slow, Its your race go your own pace.”

Chris Brinlee, Jr.
DOB: May 18, 1988
Hometown: Mena, Arkansas
Currently: All over the world; repacking in LA
Follow Chris: Instagram, Twitter, Website

Chris is an adventure travel storyteller. Basically he throws himself into adventures; then shares those stories with the world through photography, writing, video, and social media. Sometimes he’s sharing stories of others, sometimes he’s sharing his own; oftentimes it’s a combination of both. His career requires that he travel about 75% of the year which is exciting, but it’s a double-edged sword too. It can get unsettling and lonely at times, but fortunately he has some great people at home who help keep me grounded.

He’s quite the athlete; “I do a lot of mountaineering and rock climbing—both of which usually involve long approaches. I don’t do a ton of running (unless it’s through the airport,) but I do enjoy cramming 20+ mile days into weeklong backpacking trips. What is the key to those? Pack light, keep rests short, and don’t even think about wearing boots—trail runners like the Nomad are the only way to go. I ran cross country competitively my senior year of high school to prepare for a Naval Academy appointment and my coach used to compare me to Seabiscuit, saying “You’re running against guys who are fitter and faster than you. Guys you have no business competing against, but you’re beating them. They have more experience, but you have more heart.” I never ran competitively again, but I took that message to heart and apply it to everything that I do. I was once a competitive cheerleader at the NCAA D1 level. I also competed in figure skating as an adult, before getting into mountaineering.”

Why photo? I love photographing mountaineering. The environment is dynamic—challenging and ever changing; in order to photograph it, you must actively participate—which is quite the endeavor in itself. I love documenting those experiences and places that most people may never see; then using those images to inspire people to get after it themselves.

Chris’s advise to a newby photographer; “Just shoot. Like running, getting “mileage” in in the beginning is most important for building a solid base. Once you have that base, you can hone in on your niche and dominate.”

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